Home Dir


Configuring history

In [yesterday’s post][past] the past repo was described. The first step to getting that to work is to correctly configure history files in the first place. Some are easy, but some are more complex.

For [zsh][zsh] and [MySQL][mysql] it’s rather easy. Just put something like this in your ~/.zshrc:


Saving history with vcsh

I’ve written a few articles on using vcsh for tracking your home dir. Unlike previous options vcsh lets me use multiple repositories. My first experiment with this was a past repository. Lots of Unix tools use the GNU readline library so there are a number of history files to collect. I already was collecting all of them in ~/.history.d. In addition due to problems with NFS mounted home dirs I’d long ago put the hostname in the names of history files as a way to prevent file corruption.

Go utilities in ~/bin

One nice side effect of using vcsh was developing more complex scripts to help me do things. I didn’t have to worry a script or tool would get lost when a machine inevitibly died. However before writing a script, sometimes it’s not a bad idea to check and see if someone else already has. Lately many of those that I’ve found have been in Go. Originally I did these with update but it made update take a long time to run and sometimes with die if a rarely used Go util was broken.

Moving home - updates to vcsh usage

A while back I switched to vcsh. I’ve written a few articles on using it but since then I’ve migrated machines a number of times. The big issue I’ve found is having to manually install software on each machine. There are things my scripts depend on and things I just expect to have and manually creating them each time is annoying. So the solution obviously is a script. It’s actually used all the time as I might create new dependencies or find new tools I need so I’d want that installed on all machines.

Version control for ~ (v3.0)

For a long time I used NFS for my home dir. That worked great at home and at work where I’d have a desktop and server. But then I got a laptop and that stopped working. For a while I’d rsync things but then I came across a “version control your home dir” article (this one?) and was hooked.